Nov 162017
 

Lindsey Van Zandt is officially the #1 ranked pound for pound female fighter in the state of New Jersey. Lindsey earned a decision victory over Bi Nguyen. Bi was the heavily favored fighter, 96% of voters picked Bi to win the bout, but Lindsey used her stellar wrestling, ground and pound and submission attempts to dominate the bout.

Unfortunately, Lindsey broke her hand with the very first punch she threw. She showed tremendous heart fighting through the pain and earning the victory, but she will now need to take an extended break as her injury heals. The time off is well earned though, Lindsey has had 3 professional fights in a 4 months streak. Most active fighters take 3 fights in an entire calendar year!

Learn more about Lindsey in this in great video

Live in Poughkeepsie and want to pursue your Hudson Valley MMA dreams? Call Precision boxing and MMA at 845-392-8495 or visit http://www.poughkeepsiemixedmartialarts.com to get started!

Apr 042016
 

Precision MMA continued its winning ways when coach Karl “Mr. Fantastic” Nemeth returned to the cage to defend his Kaged Kombat Featherweight MMA title.

Going into this fight Karl was considered the heavy underdog.  His opponent TJ George was 8-1 and was riding a 7 fight winning streak winning all his fights by stoppage. According to the official MMA rankings George was the #2 fighter in the entire state, while Karl was barely on the radar.

11872171 10100878029239440 7570455778778159137 o 300x168 Congratulations Karl Nemeth On Defending His MMA Title!

 

 

 

 

 

 

However, the students at Precision MMA knew more than the odds makers and were all very confident Karl would put his black belt skills on display.

When the fight began George marched forward and executed a single leg takedown.  From there Karl immediately transitioned to his rubber guard and began a rapid fire series of submissions.  George attempted to counter with a knee bar attempt of his own, not realizing leg locks are coach Karl’s specialty.  Karl countered the knee bar and transitioned into a beautiful calf crush resulting in an immediate submission just minutes into the very first round.

Calf crush submissions are extremely rare in mixed martial arts since they require such a high degree of skill to implement, this is Karl’s second consecutive victory using the esoteric submission.

karl title 300x300 Congratulations Karl Nemeth On Defending His MMA Title!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Train with the only MMA Champions in the Poughkeepsie area Free for 30 days call 845-392-8495 or visit http://www.poughkeepsiemixedmartialarts.com to get started

 

 

Mar 102016
 

It has been a busy couple of weeks for the Mixed Martial Arts fighters out of Precision MMA.

First we had Alec Hooben returning to action against tough veteran Jordan Mitchell.  Hooben jumped up a weight class to take on his heavyweight opponent after a string of other fighters backed out.  Despite battling a nasty head cold and a 40 pound weight disadvantage Hooben was able to secure the unanimous decision victory after scoring numerous takedowns and ground and pound.

hoob 225x300 Precision MMA fighters in Action

Hooben with head coach Brian McLaughlin

hooben 300x198 Precision MMA fighters in Action

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next up was Sean “Shorty-Rock” Santella.  Sean is coach Brian’s protege and has his sights set on the UFC.  At CFFC ion Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Sean earned his 15th professional victory and extended his winning streak.  Sean was dominant throughout the bout landing spinning back fists, high kicks, and dominated his BJJ Black Belt opponent on the ground securing numerous close submissions.

 

 

shorty1 300x210 Precision MMA fighters in Action shorty2 300x292 Precision MMA fighters in Action

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next up is Precision Muay Thai coach Karl “Mr. Fantastic” Nemeth as he defends his 145 Kaged Kombat MMA Title in Saratoga, NY.  His opponent TJ George is curently the #2 ranked fighter in the state and riding a 7 fight winning streak.  With a victory, coach Karl will cement his place as the top fighter in the region.

 

12076823 precision front 300x177 Precision MMA fighters in Action

Poughkeepsie MMA

 

If you live in Poughkeepsie, LaGrange or anywhere within the Hudson Valley and would like to train like a fighter call Precision MMA at 845-392-84954 or visit http://www.bjjfighter.com and get started on your 30 day free trial

Aug 272015
 

Congratulations to Precision MMA’s newest Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu purple belt Johnny Miranda!  Johnny has been one of Precision’s hardest working members for the past three years and he has now joined the exclusive club of Brian McLaughlin purple belts. In addition to training BJJ, muay thai and MMA Johnny is also a rock star – he’s the lead singer and front man for the group Via Vanity.

 

johnny 300x225 Heres Johnny!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interested in training MMA in the Hudson Valley? Check out Precision MMA free for 30 days call 845-392-8495 or visit http://www.BJJFighter.com to get started

Mar 092014
 

In many ways training martial arts is easier today than ever before.  The popularity of MMA competition has made arts such as Brazilian Jiu-jitsu and Muay Thai more accessible to the public.  The internet has allowed techniques to travel across the world in a matter of seconds.  Schools such as Precision MMA in LaGrange, NY now have experts in striking and grappling under the same roof in large world class facilities.  When I began training in the 90′s BJJ and muay thai were unknown.  There were very few training partners to work with and the gyms were small “hole in the wall” facilities.  Instructional videos were few and far between.  Gyms would not mix their styles so I would have to travel to one gym for boxing, another for jiu-jitsu, another for muay thai and still another for wrestling.

Poughkeepsie Martial Arts 300x224 The Secret Success Formula

Precision MMA Lagrange, NY

Martial arts today is almost a completely different world in 2014.  However, one thing has remained constant – the essential steps for success.  Half my life has been dedicated to training and in that time I have narrowed the path to greatness down to a three step recipe.

#1 Make martial arts a priority in your life

Seems simple enough, but this is the most neglected step in the success formula.  If you want to become great at something it has to become a lifestyle.  Our priorities are things that hold a strong place in our daily routines.  They are the things that must get done.  Other things must work around our priorities.  This can come up in many ways in our daily life.  For example, if you want to add a “movie night” to your weekly routine make sure it’s not during your class time.  If you have a test to study for wake up earlier or go to bed later, but do not allow it to replace your mat time.  If there is a time draining activity like playing video games or watching reality TV that makes getting to class difficult eliminate it.  Treat your training time like a no-excuse, must attend obligation and success will be difficult to avoid.  Additionally, make sure your lifestyle supports your martial arts training.  This may mean prioritizing rest so that you can properly recover from hard sessions or improving your diet so you have the fuel to make it through long sessions.

priority 265x300 The Secret Success Formula

Precision MMA LaGrange, NY

 

#2 Show up

Their is an old saying that 80% of success is simply showing up. If you are absent from class you’ll never pass the test.  People will often tell me how important martial arts is in their life, but actions speak louder than words.  The ones who mean are those with the most marks on their attendance card.  Additionally, the more your are in class the more your instructor can understand your learning style and physical abilities as well as limitations.  A teacher and student that work together on a regular and uninterrupted basis have an understanding that brings out the best in both of them.  Your ability to get to class is directly proportional to how much of a priority you’ve made martial arts in your life, in that way the first two steps are forever linked.

 

#3 Training the right way

Sometimes the biggest determinant of success is not simply the hours you put in, but what you put into the hours.  When it’s time to train turn your cell phone off, focus your mind and commit yourself wholly to improving.  Drill with a purpose, ask questions when confused, follow your coaches advice, step outside your comfort zone and challenge yourself.  There are some people with 10 years of experience and then others with one year repeated ten times.  The difference is the amount of effort that is put forth in expanding one’s abilities.  If you struggle with your guard begin rolling from your back, if your head movement is lacking make yourself do rounds of pure defense – don’t avoid your pitfalls, but rather face them head on.

hard work 300x238 The Secret Success Formula

Precision MMA LaGrange, NY

 

This is the formula used by myself and many others to find success inside the four walls at Precision MMA.  The nice part of this recipe is that it doesn’t rely on anything other than hard work and dedication abilities which are naturally within the grasp of all.  Choose to be successful!

 

 

 

 

 

 

12076823 precision front 300x177 The Secret Success Formula

Precision MMA Lagrange, NY

 

Looking to train mixed martial arts in LaGrange, NY?  Check out Precision MMA Free for 30 Days call 845-392-845 or visit http://www.poughkeepsiemixedmartialarts.com

 

 

 

 

 

Author Brian McLaughlin is the head coach at Precision MMA in LaGrange, NY.  He is a Tampa Gracie black belt in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu as well as a former professional mixed martial artist with over 15 years of training.

Aug 252013
 

Coach Brian hits a textbook “Marcelotine” choke (a variation of the guillotine shown hereMMA Tampa) in the expert division at the North American Grappling New York Championship.

Learn these and other Hudson Valley MMA techniques at Precision MMA in LaGrange, NY call 845-392-8495 or click here to get started

 

Aug 052013
 
1518944923 6a0943f157 300x199 4 Ground and Pound Techniques Used in High Level MMA

Hudson Valley MMA Ground n Pound

“Ground and pound”.  To the lay person this phrase means little, but to the initiated fan of modern day Mixed Martial Arts this is a term which has become quite well known in recent years, much to the credit of color commentators for the Ultimate Fighting Championship like Joe Rogan and Mike Goldberg amongst others.  But what exactly is “ground and pound”?  Most MMA fans who have never trained with actual fighters or who only watch the sport casually will give answers that are not really satisfactory.  The most common is that “ground and pound” is a style of striking an opponent on the ground in MMA, with the emphasis usually being on the methods used by the fighter in top position to strike the bottom fighter.  While this statement is generally correct it does not truly do justice to the skill which many top fighters call their number one method for attaining victory.  As anyone who has trained with a skilled Pro MMA fighter knows, “ground and pound” has every bit as many nuances as submission grappling, takedowns or stand up striking.  Many people with limited training believe that there is little technique to striking on the ground and that once a fighter achieves a takedown he need only reign down punches or elbows until the referee steps in.  However, “ground and pound” is a skill in itself and simply “swinging away” on a downed opponent with little regard to technique is a good way to get submitted or swept by an opponent with a good Jiu-Jitsu game.  In this article I will outline four different “ground and pound” techniques which have been used by different fighters in high level MMA fights and explain what makes these techniques so effective.

There is no more fitting way to begin an article on the skill of ground-striking in MMA than to start with the man often quoted as “the godfather of Ground and Pound”, Mark “the Hammer” Coleman.  Coleman began his MMA career back in 1996 at UFC 10, the early days of Mixed Martial Arts when the sport had yet to be regulated under the “Unified Rules”.  Coming from a wrestling background and having been a former NCAA champion, the 6’1, 255lbs bruiser took to fighting like a fish to water.  In those days Royce Gracie had already established the value of ground grappling and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in MMA, and this is what truly paved the way for wrestlers, cluing them in to the fact that taking the opponent down and finishing them on the ground was a legitimate method for winning a contest.  However, Royce had usually won his fights by using submission holds such as chokes and armlocks, rather than bludgeoning the opponent into defeat with punches, hammerfists, knees and elbows.  Lacking the submission techniques available to BJJ artists but having every bit as much knowledge of ground positioning, Coleman was perhaps the first Mixed Martial Artist to routinely win fights simply by taking his opponents down and striking them until a referee either stepped in or they were rendered unconscious.  Coleman had many methods for doing this, but one that I am going to look at in particular is what I will refer to as the “head in face” technique.  This is one of the primary techniques which “The Hammer” used to win the most important fight in his career, his victory over Igor Vovchanchin in the “Pride Grand Prix 2000 finals” which led to his becoming the first ever Pride HW tournament champion.  In essence this technique is quite simple, and yet devastatingly effective, and it is based on a few important principles that anyone must understand in order to recognize what makes for an effective “ground and pound” tactic.  In this fight, Coleman made used of the “head in face technique” by standing in Igor’s full guard, then driving his forehead into his face and from there, punching in succession to the body, followed by single shots to the head.

Now, there are four important principles to ground and pound which one must understand if they are to separate a truly superior “gn’p” technique from simply striking a grounded opponent with reckless abandon.  These principles are 1) controlling the arms 2) controlling the hips 3) controlling the head and 4) mixing up one’s strikes.   Anyone who studies the art of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu knows that controlling the hips and the head make a grounded opponent nearly helpless, and this same principle applies to wrestling and “ground and pound”.  If an opponent does not have free range of motion with his head then his hip movement is going to be very limited and likewise if he does not have full movement of his hips then his head movement will probably not amount to much.  Let me explain more clearly.  All bodily motion is dependent upon movement of the spine, which goes as far up as the back of the neck and base of the head, and as far down as the tailbone, which is parallel to the hips at the front of the body.  The two points of the body where the spine provides its greatest function are at its top and bottom, in other words, the neck/head area, and the hip/lower back area.  If a grappler controls one of these two points he has a good deal of control over his opponent.  If he controls both his opponent’s mobility is practically null as he has isolated his spine at both of its key points and this will make strikes very difficult to defend against.  This is essentially how control of hip and head movement makes for an effective “gnp” technique.

On the other hand, controlling an opponent’s arms is important because you take away his main tools of offense and most importantly, his greatest method of defense.  Controlling one of your opponent’s arms is often enough to prevent him from escaping or countering most forms of “ground and pound”, while controlling both of them makes his ability to counter or escape even more difficult, granted of course that the aggressor has some sort of head or hip control.

Finally, mixing up strikes makes for an effective “ground and pound” tactic because the opponent never really knows what to expect.  This means directing blows to different parts of the body, head and even limbs, as well as using different types of strikes such as hammerfists, downward elbows, diagonal elbows and straight and looping punches.

With Mark Coleman’s “head in face” attack on Igor Vovchanchin, he made good use of the first two and the fourth principles.  He controlled Igor’s head very well, which in turn allowed him to control his hips, and he mixed up his strikes to the body and head.  What Coleman did in this fight was to essentially stand up in Igor’s full guard and drive his head directly into Igor’s face, making his own head and neck a fifth point of contact with the ground so that he could base off of it and throw his punches with full power without sacrificing his balance.  With his feet planted and his hips above his opponents’, the bottom man’s hips were also limited in their mobility.  In this particular situation, since Igor could not free his head his spine and body as a whole were isolated and his guard rendered quite ineffective.  The placement of Coleman’s forehead in Igor’s face provided two other special advantages, in that it limited Igor’s view of the strikes coming at him and also caused him quite a bit of discomfort.  Coleman also directed his strikes to different areas, generally throwing several times to the body and once or twice to the head in succession.  As such, Igor was less capable of guessing where the strikes would land next, and thus had a more difficult time defending.  This is a technique which Coleman’s protégé Kevin Randleman would also later use with great success in his fighting career.

bio rickson 203x300 4 Ground and Pound Techniques Used in High Level MMA

Rickson Gracie doing the gift wrap

However, an even more effective “ground and pound” tactic than Coleman’s “head in face technique” is the mounted “gift wrap” which the great Rickson Gracie used to defeat Masakatsu Funaki back in 2000.  The Gracie family is well known for introducing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu to the world, but their style of ground fighting is not only effective for submissions, it is also effective for striking as Rickson proved in this fight.  Now it is important to note that the most significant aspect of Rickson’s “gift wrap” on Funaki is not the trapping of his arm, but rather, the mount position itself.  When a grappler passes his opponents’ guard and is able to mount him he has complete control over his opponents’ hips because his entire body is positioned above them.  As such, the opponent’s legs have been taken out of the equation and his upper body has been isolated.  He does, however, still have movement of his head and the top portion of his spine, but as we will see Rickson’s technique later prevents this.  In this fight, after weakening Funaki with some shots from mount, he grips Funaki’s right wrist with his right hand, while reaching under Funaki’s head with left arm.  Following this, Rickson feeds Funaki’s right wrist to his own left hand which is underneath Masakatsu’s head.  This results in Rickson being mounted on Funaki while the latter’s right arm is completely wrapped around his own head, leaving him with only one arm to defend against Rickson’s strikes.  Not only is Funaki’s right arm now trapped, but his head is also held firmly in place by his own arm and his hips are being completely controlled by Rickson’s mount.  Goals 1, 2 and 3 of our “gnp” outline have now been met, and Funaki has no way to defend himself since almost his entire body is being controlled.  This is another outstanding “ground and pound” technique which works well for MMA.

aldocrucifix12 300x200 4 Ground and Pound Techniques Used in High Level MMA

The Mounted Crucifix

The third “ground and pound” position we will discuss has become quite popular in Mixed Martial Arts today and is generally referred to as “the side mounted crucifix”.  This move has a number of variations and has been used very successfully by a number of fighters, most notably Jon Jones in his UFC Live 2 win over Vladimir Matyushenko and Roy Nelson in his win over Kimbo Slice on “The Ultimate Fighter” Season 10.  Much like Rickson’s mounted “gift wrap”, the most important component of this technique is first having a dominant position, in this case side mount.  Once sidemounted, the top opponent is past the bottom man’s hips much like a mounted opponent would be, except that in this case he has his weight distributed sidewise across his opponent’s chest and abdomen rather than being directly on top of him as he would be when mounted.  From this position, both of the opponent’s arms are tied up with the top man having one arm free to punch or elbow his opponent’s head.  This technique covers points 1, 2 and 3 of our “ground and pound” index.  First, not only one but both of the opponent’s arms are trapped.  Second, the hips are isolated in the sense that the guard has been passed and the legs cannot be used for much and the weight distribution of the top opponent makes hip movement difficult for the bottom man.  Finally, with both shoulders and hips pinned to the mat and a large body across the bottom man’s chest, the defender’s head has fairly little mobility as well.  The position can be made more effective by mixing up one’s strikes and Jones proved in his fight that it is possible to finish an opponent from here with elbows while Nelson proved in his that it is equally possible to dominate by punching with the free hand.

The final “ground and pound” position that I would like to discuss in this article is not usually recognized as such because it is done from a bottom position, but I would personally consider it every bit as valid as many done from top control and this is the “triangle position” from bottom guard.  Most people see the triangle as a submission only due to its ability to cut off the blood to the brain, causing the opponent to either tap out or pass out.  However, as Anderson Silva proved in his victory over Travis Lutter at UFC 67, this can also be a dominant position from which to land multiple short elbow strikes which in this case resulted in a submission not from the choke, but from the strikes being delivered.  Generally, the term “ground and pound” seems to be reserved for striking techniques delivered by the top fighter to the bottom fighter, and the reason for this is most likely because strikes delivered from on top tend to have more weight and force behind them.  Usually ending a fight with strikes from the bottom is difficult to do, unless, of course, it abides by enough of the 4 rules of our “ground and pound” index, like the triangle does.  First, it is important to note that the guard position is the only bottom position capable of being considered dominant because the bottom man’s legs do partially shut off full movement of the top man’s hips.  Because the bottom guard player has his ankles positioned above the hips of the top man, the top fighter cannot advance further to fully isolate the bottom man’s hips.  This is the first key to why the triangle can be considered a dominant position despite being done from on bottom.  The second reason is that one of the top opponent’s arms is taken out of the equation by the unique positioning of the bottom man, and the other arm is trapped across the bottom man’s chest, making it difficult for him to defend against strikes which was another key to successful “gn’p” that we mentioned.  Finally, the most important aspect of why the “triangle position” is a dominant angle for “gnp” is because it exercises maximum head control.  The top opponent’s head is being completely controlled by the legs and arms of the bottom man.  As such, the top point of his spine is isolated and his mobility is greatly lessened.  In the case of the Anderson/Lutter fight, Anderson had such a good triangle sunk in that he was able to deliver downward elbow strikes until the ref stepped in.  As can be seen, if one thinks outside of the box and utilizes enough of the principles of the “ground and pound” index, it is possible to stop a fight with strikes even from a bottom position.

Clearly “ground and pound” techniques are not effective because of top position alone, they are dependent upon a number of principles being used effectively.  The Mark Coleman/Igor Vovchanchin fight is an excellent example of how unique head control can be used to create enough pressure from top guard to threaten an opponent.  The Rickson Gracie/Funaki fight is an example of how head and arm control can be obtained simultaneously from top mount leaving the opponent with no method of defense from strikes. Jones’ and Nelson’s “sidemounted crucifixes” are examples of how both arms of the bottom man can be trapped simultaneously leaving him vulnerable.  Finally, the example of Anderson Silva’s triangle on Travis Lutter shows that if proper head control is utilized even a bottom position can give a fighter enough power to stop a fight with successive blows.  Next time you watch MMA and you see strikes being thrown on the ground I suggest that you pay attention to which of the four points from our “ground and pound index” are being applied, and take note of what the aggressor could be doing to make his ground striking more effective.  Knowledge of “ground and pound” techniques and the principles behind them will enhance your enjoyment as a Mixed Martial Arts’ viewer just as much as it can increase a fighter’s effectiveness in the ring.

Jamey Bazes is a Hudson Valley martial arts practitioner holding a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu brown belt with over 15 years of competition experience earning over 100 tournament victories.  He also holds a Masters of Arts Degree in English from SUNY New Paltz with a focus on the English Romantic poets.

 

Jun 202013
 
12076823 precision front 300x177 Hudson Valley Martial Arts   Precision MMA makes fighters out of Novices

Hudson Valley Martial arts

Finding success in the Hudson Valley martial arts world is not always easy.  It is certainly true that people might define “success” differently.  Many dojos are content to hand out black belts as if they were representative of nothing more than the fabric which they are made out of, but there is one marker of success which never lies, and that is competition.  Whether a martial artist chooses to test himself in Amateur or Professional Mixed Martial Arts, Muay Thai Kickboxing, Boxing, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu or some other competitive format, in all cases one’s opponent is not going to be interested in placating one’s ego and is going to do his utmost to prevent his adversary from being successful against him.  It is for this reason that Hudson Valley martial arts practitioners at Precision MMA are so proud of our ability to turn novices into successful competitors and fighters.  Many people have come through the doors of Precision with no martial arts’ training whatsoever, only to find themselves having success in the ring in record time.  The results speak for themselves and show that we know what we are doing when it comes to teaching effective Hudson Valley martial arts.

When a dedicated but entirely inexperienced student first enters Precision Mixed Martial Arts in the Hudson Valley area of New York, we might liken them to a piece of clay, and our instructors to master sculptors.  As long as the student is willing to learn and do whatever is necessary to be successful our instructors can turn them into a living, breathing work of art. People are transformed by the practice of martial arts every day.  Their physiques are molded from plain or overweight to toned and conditioned.  Their self-image often improves with this.  But most of all, the practice of martial arts can make a formidable opponent with a wide range of combat skills out of just about anyone.  Precision MMA has taken Hudson Valley martial arts students with no prior experience and turned them into successful fighters of different kinds and this is always very exciting to see for the instructors and also for the fellow students who are just starting off themselves and looking to these fighters as an example to follow.  And not only do we at Precision sculpt novices into fighters, but we can also teach them to become effective martial arts’ instructors as well.

hassan 300x200 Hudson Valley Martial Arts   Precision MMA makes fighters out of Novices

Hudson Valley martial arts

One example of a Hudson Valley martial arts success story at Precision MMA where a novice quickly became a veteran is that of John Joy.  Only a few years ago Joy began his training at Precision having never done any sort of martial art in his life.  The arts which Joy chose to focus on were mainly Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Boxing, particularly the latter.  Within a short time Joy gained his blue belt in Jiu-Jitsu and became a tough roll for anyone in the studio, but his most pronounced progress was in Boxing.  Within just a couple years, Joy became a serious threat to all competitors on the Hudson Valley circuit and has had numerous victories in local AKBF fights.  He is himself now a boxing instructor at Precision and teaches others how to do exactly what he did.  In this way, the student becomes the teacher and so on until everyone at Precision is learning from each other and thriving.  Iron sharpens iron as they say.

Joe Carbone is another example of someone who recently had no martial arts’ training and became a quite successful Amateur Muay Thai fighter.  When Joe first came to Precision he had never had a competitive fight, yet he took to Muay Thai like a fish to water and has now had several AKBF victories.  Much like Joy, he is now also an instructor at Precision and helps beginners as well as advanced Hudson Valley martial arts students to learn the subtleties of Muay Thai in both our regular Kickboxing and circuit Kickboxing classes.

One of Precision MMA’s biggest success stories is that of Mike Piekarski.  “Pantene”, as we affectionately call him, had never trained in the martial arts before he came to Precision about eight or nine years back, and in fact had stated early on that he had never been very interested in sports in general.  However, over time Mike became extremely skilled in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Muay Thai Kickboxing, and Mixed Martial Arts.  Eventually Mike earned his Purple Belt in BJJ and went on to win several expert BJJ competitions.  He then began to focus on MMA and Muay Thai and began competing on the Amateur MMA circuits in the Northeastern United States.  Before going Pro in 2011, Mike recorded an impressive 3-2 record in Amateur MMA, with wins by way of guillotine choke, brabo choke and unanimous decision, while none of his opponents were able to finish him within the time limit.  He also won an AKBF Muay Thai bout, proving his skill in striking and showing those in the Hudson Valley that Precision’ martial artists are not to be reckoned with in the Muay Thai ring either.  Eventually Mike had his first Professional Mixed Martial Arts fight in 2011, which he won by decision.  We at Precision MMA were all very proud to see one of our own do so well under so many different competition formats.

karl 300x200 Hudson Valley Martial Arts   Precision MMA makes fighters out of Novices

Hudson Valley martial arts

One student who we at Precision Mixed Martial Arts are particularly proud of is Karl Nemeth.  At about 6’0 and around 150lbs, Karl might not strike your average person as looking particularly intimidating, and yet he is one of the finest Hudson Valley martial artists that Precision has, and quite possibly our most feared competitor.  When Karl first came to us several years back he had no martial arts’ training and would probably not have considered himself a natural athlete.  However, he took his training extremely seriously from day one, especially in the arts of Muay Thai Kickboxing and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and today is one of only three BJJ brown belts training at Precision.  Karl has won a few Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu tournaments, however, his most impressive accomplishments have been in the Kickboxing ring.  Karl is himself an undefeated AKBF Muay Thai champion, with seven wins in total, three of them which he has won by spectacular head kick knockouts.  In fact, Karl has acquired quite a name for himself in the Hudson Valley and has begun to have a bit of trouble getting opponents to agree to fight him because of his reputation as a dangerous opponent.  Like Joy and Carbone, he also teaches at Precision and is our head Muay Thai instructor and has coached many of our other students in their fights as well.  He is an excellent example of the kind of competitor that the instructors at Precision MMA are capable of producing.

For our instructors, producing capable martial artists from scratch is much like a science experiment: if positive results can be repeated successfully under different competition formats and different environments then we at Precision in the Hudson Valley know we have an effective formula.    Students with no prior experience have been able to walk into Precision one day and walk out a couple years later with wins in boxing, Jiu-Jitsu, Amateur and Professional Mixed Martial Arts, as well as championship belts in Muay Thai Kickboxing.  This has given us the confidence to stand by our product at all times when under scrutiny.

 

We at Precision MMA know we can make you a successful Hudson Valley martial arts competitor as well.  Just leave your ego at the door and come train with us for a free 30-day trial, and tomorrow you could be sharing your success story with your friends and family. To get started call 845-392-8495 or visit http://www.bjjfighter.com

Jamey Bazes is a lifelong martial artist holding a brown belt in both Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Kenpo Karate.  He also holds a master’s degree from SUNY New Paltz.  Originally a Tampa Gracie member, he is a student of Precision Mixed Martial Arts in LaGrange, NY (in the Dutchess County) and a decorated competitor including a Delaware Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu State Championship and a NAGA World Title.  To train kickboxing with Jamey in Dutchess County NY check out Precision MMA http://www.poughkeepsiemixedmartialarts.com

 

 

Jun 182013
 
anaconda 300x225 Hudson Valley Martial Arts Classes   Precision Mixed Martial Arts Teaches Moves Used in the UFC

Hudson Valley Martial Arts

Many martial arts schools in the Hudson Valley area of New York claim to teach techniques which are effective in high level Mixed Martial Arts promotions.  However, most of these dojos are stretching the truth and are in fact passing off illegitimate moves as authentic.  At Precision Mixed Martial Arts in the Hudson Valley we teach Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu submissions which are routinely used in the Ultimate Fighting Championship, which is the premier MMA event in the world.  In fact, many of the submissions taught at Precision were used this past weekend on Saturday, June 8th in Brazil at UFC 160.  This just goes to show that our Hudson Valley Martial Arts program is top-tier!

UFC 160 this past Saturday had a stacked card full of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu experts whose mastery of the gentle art was on display.  Multiple different types of martial arts submission holds were utilized to win bouts, ranging from various different types of chokes, to armlocks to leglocks.  This was exciting to see since it proves that Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is alive and well at the highest level of Mixed Martial Arts competition and especially because all of these martial arts’ techniques are currently taught at Precision Mixed Martial Arts in the Hudson Valley.  Of the twelve fights on the card, nine of them ended by way of submission, making the event all the more entertaining for us Jiu-Jitsukas at Precision.  In Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu there are three main types of submission holds used to get the opponent to surrender by way of “tapping out”.  These three varieties of submissions are choke holds which cut off the blood to the brain and can render an opponent unconscious; arm locks which can hyper extend the elbow or shoulder joints, and leg locks which can disable an opponent’s knees or ankles.  We at Precision Mixed Martial Arts in the Hudson Valley teach all of these martial arts techniques, but many schools do not, or else if they do, they do not teach them properly.  Our head instructor Brian McLaughlin is a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt whose lineage can be traced to the great Royce Gracie and who is himself a Mixed Martial Artist with a record of 6-2 who has used some of the same techniques on display at this past UFC, so we at Precision know that what we are teaching is legit.

On the undercard at UFC 160 one of the best submissions utilized was a knee bar which Antonio Braga Neto used to disable fellow Mixed Martial Artist Anthony Smith.  Many martial arts’ schools neglect to teach leg locks because they think they are too dangerous, but Precision in the Hudson Valley teaches them frequently and in great detail.  Another great submission used to attain victory was a rear naked choke used by Caio Maghalaes to put Karlos Vemola out of commission.  We also teach this submission at the Hudson Valley’s best martial arts gym – Precision Mixed Martial Arts and it has been used by our instructor Brian McLaughlin to win two of his Mixed Martial Arts fights.  In another exciting match up, mixed martial artist Raphael Assuncao utilized an arm lock to defeat Vaughan Lee, and this is also a martial arts’ technique which has been used by our head instructor to attain victory in MMA and which he teaches to all our students frequently.  Furthermore, Rony Mariano Bezera made use of the famous triangle choke to finish off his opponent Mike Wilkinson in only 1:24 of the first round, and this move has also been used by McLaughlin to win three of his fights and is possibly the most popular submission taught at Precision.  Daniel Sarafian used a different variety of strangle hold, known as an arm triangle choke, to put formidable fighter Eddie Mendez to sleep, and this technique was used once again later on the card by Leonardo Santos to take out his opponent William Macario.  The submission of the night award was won by Erick Silva who caught his adversary Jason High in a reverse triangle arm bar, a very unique technique not often seen in Mixed Martial Arts which is also taught at Precision Martial Arts in the Hudson Valley.  Finally, in the main event between two excellent martial artists Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira and Fabricio Werdum, Werdum hyper extended Nogueira’s elbow with a belly down arm lock to cap off the night.

12076823 precision front 300x177 Hudson Valley Martial Arts Classes   Precision Mixed Martial Arts Teaches Moves Used in the UFC

Hudson Valley Martial Arts

Many people who don’t train in Hudson Valley martial arts do not realize that not all dojos or Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu schools teach such a wide variety of submission holds, or that they work in high level MMA events like the UFC.  If you are interested in learning these effective holds, come train at Precision MMA in the Hudson Valley for 30 free days and you will soon find yourself performing these moves instead of simply watching them on TV.

Jamey Bazes is a lifelong martial artist holding a brown belt in both Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Kenpo Karate.  He also holds a master’s degree from SUNY New Paltz.  He is a student of Precision Mixed Martial Arts in LaGrange, NY (in the Dutchess County) and a decorated competitor including a Delaware Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu State Championship and a NAGA World Title.  To train kickboxing with Jamey in Dutchess County NY check out Precision MMA http://www.poughkeepsiemixedmartialarts.com

Jun 112013
 

Hudson Valley Martial Arts Expert Brian McLaughlin has launched a new grappling website so that he can share his martial arts techniques with the greater jiu-jitsu world at http://www.learntograpple.com

The goal of the website is two fold – first to make jiu-jitsu techniques available to people who do not have an academy in their area thereby allowing them to learn and enjoy grappling from the comfort of their own home.

The second reason was to give Precision MMA students the chance to review techniques taught in class.  The site breaks down each technique and covers common mistakes to help the student avoid common pitfalls.

Check out this technique – one of the most effective sweeps in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and a favorite amongst the Hudson Valley martial arts practitioners of Precision MMA

 

Like what you see and want to learn more?  If you live in the Hudson Valley and would like to train martial arts visit http://www.poughkeepsiemixedmartialarts.com